March ran out like a lion, but spring is in the air here in Falmouth and Woods Hole!  With the warmer air comes the first crocuses, the witch hazel, daffodils and then sometime in May the cherry trees will bloom.

Drive along Woods Hole Road in the springtime and you will enjoy the work of generations of Falmouth residents committed to planting daffodil bulbs.  This year, Daffodil Days at Spohr Gardens, a nearby land preserve on the edge of a beautiful Cape Cod saltwater pond, are cc to cc.  If Mother Nature obliges, this year will bring another beautiful display.

Liam Maguire

Liam Maguire

 

On Thursday February 27th Liam Maguire’s Irish Pub & Restaurant was closed for a private party. That morning the four Maguires; Liam, with his wife Deb and their sons Rory and Shea, traveled to Faneuil Hall in Boston to be sworn in as an American citizen. There were over 300 other immigrants becoming citizens that day. Deb Maguire described the ceremony as inspiring.

Liam is 72 years old and has lived and worked in Falmouth for 20 years. There were over 50 people at the party and a fine time was had by all. The party was a complete surprise to him. As he and Deb were driving into Falmouth after encountering a blinding snow squall on the way home from Boston, Liam announced, that he wanted to go home in order to take a nap to prepare for his scheduled performance that evening. Deb fortunately was able to convince him to stop by the pub on their way to the house. We can only imagine his surprise when he saw the red, white and blue bunting decorating the pub’s exterior.

Liam told reporters, “I am happy to be an American. I’ve lived here a long time and it’s about time I become a citizen.” None of us could figure out why it took so long for him to apply for citizenship. The explanation was that he has been busy and just had not taken the time to fill out the papers. Liam said, “It was the land of opportunity, that is why everyone came to America. There was work. I didn’t leave to stay. I left to work and I got more work and more work and all of a sudden, I ended up staying. This is my home now. I’ve lived here 20 years.”

Liam went on to talk about how he eventually found his niche in Falmouth. He talked about the strife in Northern Ireland where he lived up until he turned 20. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1941.  He and his twin brother were only 3 weeks old when the Nazis bombed his village. At that time his father, who was originally from Northern Ireland decided to move back to his homeland. That was where Liam would spend his youth. At the age of 20 he traveled to London to work, then to Spain, then to Germany and finally back to Ireland. He played music as a profession, mostly as a solo performer but occasionally with bands. To this day he continues to play traditional Irish music. After working as a musician and balladeer, he was offered work in the US and Canada. He goes on to talk about all of the work that was offered to him in America that  made him think that this is where he should make his home. He says, “I think I’ve toured most of the United States. Alaska is the only state I haven’t been to.”

Falmouth is looking forward to a wonderful St. Patrick’s Day celebration and Liam Maguire’s Pub will be one of many business and B&Bs celebrating. 

Liam Maguire

Liam Maguire

 

On Thursday February 27th Liam Maguire’s Irish Pub & Restaurant was closed for a private party. That morning the four Maguires; Liam, with his wife Deb and their sons Rory and Shea, traveled to Faneuil Hall in Boston to be sworn in as an American citizen. There were over 300 other immigrants becoming citizens that day. Deb Maguire described the ceremony as inspiring.

Liam is 72 years old and has lived and worked in Falmouth for 20 years. There were over 50 people at the party and a fine time was had by all. The party was a complete surprise to him. As he and Deb were driving into Falmouth after encountering a blinding snow squall on the way home from Boston, Liam announced, that he wanted to go home in order to take a nap to prepare for his scheduled performance that evening. Deb fortunately was able to convince him to stop by the pub on their way to the house. We can only imagine his surprise when he saw the red, white and blue bunting decorating the pub’s exterior.

Liam told reporters, “I am happy to be an American. I’ve lived here a long time and it’s about time I become a citizen.” None of us could figure out why it took so long for him to apply for citizenship. The explanation was that he has been busy and just had not taken the time to fill out the papers. Liam said, “It was the land of opportunity, that is why everyone came to America. There was work. I didn’t leave to stay. I left to work and I got more work and more work and all of a sudden, I ended up staying. This is my home now. I’ve lived here 20 years.”

Liam went on to talk about how he eventually found his niche in Falmouth. He talked about the strife in Northern Ireland where he lived up until he turned 20. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1941.  He and his twin brother were only 3 weeks old when the Nazis bombed his village. At that time his father, who was originally from Northern Ireland decided to move back to his homeland. That was where Liam would spend his youth. At the age of 20 he traveled to London to work, then to Spain, then to Germany and finally back to Ireland. He played music as a profession, mostly as a solo performer but occasionally with bands. To this day he continues to play traditional Irish music. After working as a musician and balladeer, he was offered work in the US and Canada. He goes on to talk about all of the work that was offered to him in America that  made him think that this is where he should make his home. He says, “I think I’ve toured most of the United States. Alaska is the only state I haven’t been to.”

Falmouth is looking forward to a wonderful St. Patrick’s Day celebration and Liam Maguire’s Pub will be one of many business and B&Bs celebrating. 
Knob beachSmThere are few places on the earth more beautiful than along the shores of the ocean.  The complex ecosystem that makes up the world’s shorelines is both a marvel and a miracle.  Falmouth is blessed with 65 miles of shoreline along Buzzards Bay and Nantucket Sound, the most of any town on Cape Cod.  It is this complex and uncommon system of living plants and fauna that call millions of travelers to the seaside.

On April 22, the world acknowledges the wonders of nature and celebrates Earth Day.  Falmouth is rich in those wonders and provides access to nature via strolls on the Shining Sea Bikeway between  North Falmouth and Woods Hole, walks to the Knob in Quisset, Salt Pond Bird Sanctuary, Spohr Gardens, Beebe Woods and the Ashumet Holly Wildlife Sanctuary, just to name a few.

The Woods Hole Science Aquarium, the oldest marine aquarium in the nation, provides a unique look at both the marine species of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, but the research that goes into their study.  Celebrate the wonders of nature and the enduring shoreline on Earth Day with a visit to Falmouth and Woods Hole.

beachrosesSm

 

On Thursday February 27th Liam Maguire’s Irish Pub & Restaurant was closed for a private party. That morning the four Maguires; Liam, with his wife Deb and their sons Rory and Shea, traveled to Faneuil Hall in Boston to be sworn in as an American citizen. There were over 300 other immigrants becoming citizens that day. Deb Maguire described the ceremony as inspiring.

Liam is 72 years old and has lived and worked in Falmouth for 20 years. There were over 50 people at the party and a fine time was had by all. The party was a complete surprise to him. As he and Deb were driving into Falmouth after encountering a blinding snow squall on the way home from Boston, Liam announced, that he wanted to go home in order to take a nap to prepare for his scheduled performance that evening. Deb fortunately was able to convince him to stop by the pub on their way to the house. We can only imagine his surprise when he saw the red, white and blue bunting decorating the pub’s exterior.

Liam told reporters, “I am happy to be an American. I’ve lived here a long time and it’s about time I become a citizen.” None of us could figure out why it took so long for him to apply for citizenship. The explanation was that he has been busy and just had not taken the time to fill out the papers. Liam said, “It was the land of opportunity, that is why everyone came to America. There was work. I didn’t leave to stay. I left to work and I got more work and more work and all of a sudden, I ended up staying. This is my home now. I’ve lived here 20 years.”

Liam went on to talk about how he eventually found his niche in Falmouth. He talked about the strife in Northern Ireland where he lived up until he turned 20. He was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1941.  He and his twin brother were only 3 weeks old when the Nazis bombed his village. At that time his father, who was originally from Northern Ireland decided to move back to his homeland. That was where Liam would spend his youth. At the age of 20 he traveled to London to work, then to Spain, then to Germany and finally back to Ireland. He played music as a profession, mostly as a solo performer but occasionally with bands. To this day he continues to play traditional Irish music. After working as a musician and balladeer, he was offered work in the US and Canada. He goes on to talk about all of the work that was offered to him in America that  made him think that this is where he should make his home. He says, “I think I’ve toured most of the United States. Alaska is the only state I haven’t been to.”

Falmouth is looking forward to a wonderful St. Patrick’s Day celebration and Liam Maguire’s Pub will be one of many business and B&Bs celebrating. 

Shamrocks at your doorway,

And a host of friends that never ends

Each day your whole life through”!

 

The quintessential Village of Falmouth here on Cape Cod is opening its heart and offering a warm welcome to have you join us for a wonderful celebration of St. Patrick’s Day.  Shamrocks will pave the way for a fun filled weekend and, on occasion, there will be a leprechaun or two waving from a very quiet corner!  Don’t try to find them!! 

The lamp poles will be wrapped in green, the Irish flag will be furling from our very own Liam’s Irish Pub – always a fun place to enjoy the music and a little Bailey’s!  And to ‘top off the weekend’ – an Irish Hat Parade down Main St. on Monday!!  So don’t forget your ‘tam’!!  And, if we really have the ‘luck of the Irish’ going our way – you can take a lovely stroll on the ‘strand’ just down the way a bit.

The Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association is offering some very festive packages to go along with the weekend (3/14-17) festivities.  Some will be doing a traditional Irish breakfast, or you can indulge in a cozy afternoon Irish Teatime, along with gift certificates to some of our wonderful restaurants here in town.  We are very excited and look forward to having some wonderful folks enjoy our Irish hospitality and warm Irish smile.

20140206_112342“Top O’ The Mornin’ To Ye” from  O’Falmouth

 

“Wishing you rainbows after the rain,

Miles and miles of Irish smiles,

Shamrocks at your doorway,

And a host of friends that never ends

Each day your whole life through”!

 

The quintessential Village of Falmouth here on Cape Cod is opening its heart and offering a warm welcome to have you join us for a wonderful celebration of St. Patrick’s Day.  Shamrocks will pave the way for a fun filled weekend and, on occasion, there will be a leprechaun or two waving from a very quiet corner!  Don’t try to find them!! 

The lamp poles will be wrapped in green, the Irish flag will be furling from our very own Liam’s Irish Pub – always a fun place to enjoy the music and a little Bailey’s!  And to ‘top off the weekend’ – an Irish Hat Parade down Main St. on Monday!!  So don’t forget your ‘tam’!!  And, if we really have the ‘luck of the Irish’ going our way – you can take a lovely stroll on the ‘strand’ just down the way a bit.

The Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association is offering some very festive packages to go along with the weekend (3/14-17) festivities.  Some will be doing a traditional Irish breakfast, or you can indulge in a cozy afternoon Irish Teatime, along with gift certificates to some of our wonderful restaurants here in town.  We are very excited and look forward to having some wonderful folks enjoy our Irish hospitality and warm Irish smile.
What a joy it is to have a snowy Vermont-style winter here on Cape Cod this year.  2014 has been the snowiest winter in recent memory around here, with plenty of sledding, pond skating and magical walks through snow-transformed landscapes.

Beaches and ponds are especially gorgeous in the early morning light when the sun glints off the marsh grass and sea-ice clusters along the shore.  Falmouth’s historic districts and classic town green are straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting when dusted with the white stuff.

While residents grumble about shoveling their walk one more time, guests at local B&B’s recline in bed, enjoy hot cocoa by the fire and look out over the winter wonderland from our historic properties.

Cape Cod in snow — from the crossing over the Cape Cod canal, you are in winter vacation wonderland.  See you soon!

Woods Hole, Falmouth Ma ice and red boat on Eel Pond in Woods Hole Woods Hole, Falmouth in snow

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Candle House in Woods Hole, Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,   Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,  Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,  Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 
Candle House detail of the stonework and ship. Located in Woods Hole, Falmouth, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Photo by P.L.O’Connell.

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 
Wine and seafood by the fire at the Quarterdeck Restaurant in Falmouth, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA.

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

20140206_112342“Top O’ The Mornin’ To Ye” from  O’Falmouth

 

“Wishing you rainbows after the rain,

Miles and miles of Irish smiles,

Shamrocks at your doorway,

And a host of friends that never ends

Each day your whole life through”!

 

The quintessential Village of Falmouth here on Cape Cod is opening its heart and offering a warm welcome to have you join us for a wonderful celebration of St. Patrick’s Day.  Shamrocks will pave the way for a fun filled weekend and, on occasion, there will be a leprechaun or two waving from a very quiet corner!  Don’t try to find them!! 

The lamp poles will be wrapped in green, the Irish flag will be furling from our very own Liam’s Irish Pub – always a fun place to enjoy the music and a little Bailey’s!  And to ‘top off the weekend’ – an Irish Hat Parade down Main St. on Monday!!  So don’t forget your ‘tam’!!  And, if we really have the ‘luck of the Irish’ going our way – you can take a lovely stroll on the ‘strand’ just down the way a bit.

The Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association is offering some very festive packages to go along with the weekend (3/14-17) festivities.  Some will be doing a traditional Irish breakfast, or you can indulge in a cozy afternoon Irish Teatime, along with gift certificates to some of our wonderful restaurants here in town.  We are very excited and look forward to having some wonderful folks enjoy our Irish hospitality and warm Irish smile.

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Candle House in Woods Hole, Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Walking Cape Cod in winter is a sublime experience — enjoy clear days, spectacular Cape light, wide open beaches, strong winds, and extraordinary bird life including hawks, arctic owls and more!  Year rounders know that Cape Cod winter walks are one of the best kept secrets on the whole East Coast.

Winter rates at our local B&B’s are excellent in this the quieter season, and the beaches are wide open.  Want to bring your pet?  No problem walking on one of Falmouth’s 70 pristine beaches (several of our members have pet friendly rooms).  Looking for romantic vistas to enjoy over Valentine’s Day?  A Cape Cod winter walk can be a great place to hold hands and enjoy nature together.

The following photos are of a five mile walk on a windy January through Bourne Farm (local preservation land), along the Shining Sea bike path, past cranberry bogs and out to Chappaquoit Beach in West Falmouth.  Please enjoy the photos, bundle up and come visit us on Cape Cod in the winter.

hotel in Falmouth MA B&B romantic walks Cape Cod

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

We are fortunate on Cape Cod, the mild Gulf Stream waters keep our climate warmer than most of New England, and as such “snow days” from winter storms are few and far between. So it was with some excitement that we braced for the first winter storm on Cape Cod of 2014 in early January.

Much was made of the storm before it arrived on the news, so most businesses were shuttered as people waited it out.  But this is the opposite in the bed and breakfast business, as customers flock to our warm hearths when winter winds set in.  The Falmouth B&B’s that are open in the winter (Woods Hole Passage, Palmer House and Woods Hole Inn) pride themselves on being ready to welcome stranded travelers in any weather.

The peak of this storm came early Friday morning, January 3rd and by noon the sun was already starting to peek through the clouds showing terrific snow drifts everywhere as the high winds blew snow in every crack and crevice.  The Steamship Authority ferries to Martha’s Vineyard were halted for several hours but resumed by mid afternoon.

The snow lasted for two days before warm air drifted up from the south and melted it all away.  We enjoyed the winter wonderland while it lasted!

Falmouth B&Bs in snow Woods Hole B&Bs Falmouth B&B's open in winterWoods Hole in snow

valentines 2

Valentines Day is celebrated throughout the world on February 14 and throughout the world it represents an opportunity for people everywhere to tell someone special that they love them.  In America, Valentines Day is perhaps the most romantic day of the year and Falmouth does romance right.  From the myriad romantic bed and breakfast inns, which invite you to sit in front of warm fireplaces and sit down to elegant breakfasts, to charming and cozy village restaurants such as; Osteria La Civetta, La Cucina Sul Mare and the Glass Onion, among others in Falmouth;  Chapoquoit Grill in West Falmouth, and; Captain Kidd’s in Woods Hole, that serve up romance along with a fine dining experience.

Spend the day strolling along the quiet sands of Falmouth’s extensive beaches or shop for that special someone along the Main Street of our quaint Cape Cod village. Looking for chocolate?  Try Ben and Bill’s Chocolate Emporium, Ghelfi’s Candies, or other sweets at Cupcapes of Falmouth and Maison Villatte, all  on Main Street.  No matter what you do for the one you love, Falmouth awaits and will provide a lifetime of unforgettable and romantic memories.

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