New Year’s resolutions shouldn’t feel like items on a to-do list, they should infuse your life with passion and excitement for all that is to come. We invite you to begin 2016 by resolving to have more experiences that will eventually become beautiful memories. Book a long weekend at any one of the Falmouth Bed and Breakfasts and you’ll have a bevy of amazing experiences to choose from. One experience we highly recommend is a self guided lighthouse tour! It’s the perfect way to spend a day. Travel from Wood’s Hole to Provincetown and enjoy some of the most beautiful views on Cape. Here are a few of the must-sees along the way.

nobska

 

Nobska Lighthouse, 1828

Start with one of Falmouth’s crowning jewels, the Nobska Lighthouse (pictured to the left) which sits 87 feet above sea level. Since 1828, when the original lighthouse was first constructed, this has been a “familiar beacon for all those that go down to the sea in ships”. It has also remained a familiar beacon for all those who travel to and from Wood’s Hole! Enjoy the breathtaking panoramic views that this icon has to offer.

Sandy Neck Light

 

 

 

 

Sandy Neck Light was first established in 1826. The current tower was built in 1857 and strengthened in the 1880s. It was discontinued in 1931, replaced by a skeleton tower, which was discontinued in 1952. The light was relit as a private aid to navigation in 2007.

 

 

 

Chatham Light, known as Twin Lights before 1923, is near the “elbow” of the Cape. The only thing you’ll love more than the beauty of this incredible structure is the history. Inn keeper Samuel Nye was appointed by President Jefferson in 1808.

Chatham Light

 

Nauset Light,1838 is always a crowd pleaser. The historic lighthouse in Eastham was rescued from the edge of a sixty foot high eroding cliff in November of 1996. The tower has moved approximately 300 feet to a new location across the road and has now been restored. Knowing the back story makes seeing the tower in person that much more impressive.

Nauset Light

Race Point, 1816 was the third lighthouse on Cape Cod The original light was a 25 foot rubblestone tower that featured one of the earliest rotating beacons, which distinguished it from others on Cape Cod. In 1858 the light got a fourth order lens and, in 1874, a second keeper’s quarters. In 1875, after significant deterioration of the original tower, it was replaced with an iron tower lined with brick. The original keeper’s house was rebuilt as part of the project. The station was electrified in 1957. The larger keeper’s house was removed in 1960 and the other was updated. Enjoy the unbeatable views Race Point has to offer, the last stop on the Cape!

Race Point Light

Begin your new year with a sight seeing trip up the Cape. Take a bunch of photos and create your very own ‘Lighthouses of Cape Cod’ book! At the end of the day, return to your cozy B&B for a hot drink on a cool night! Nothing will beat the memories you’ll take home with you!

 

Bailey's By the Sea

Bailey’s By the Sea

Captain's Manor Inn

Captain’s Manor Inn


 

Bailey's By the Sea

Bailey’s By the Sea

Captain's Manor Inn

Captain’s Manor Inn


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shop, dine, be pampered, or immerse yourself in history – all without leaving Main Street!

The shops on Main Street in Falmouth Village truly have it all. Have a dinner party to attend and need the perfect hostess gift? Shops like Homespun Gardens and Twigs offer an array of unique items from tableware to jewelry. Perhaps you’re in the market for an updated wardrobe? Maxwell & Co. carries a truly inspired collection of men’s and women’s clothing and each item purchased can be tailored on premises free of charge – they make shopping an artful experience. Main Street is also home to one of Cape Cod’s icons – The Black Dog which is the perfect spot to stop for gifts for those at home. It’s not a Cape Cod vacation without a black dog sweatshirt! Commemorate your vacation with a beautiful piece from Falmouth Jewelry Shop, a family owned and operated business that will help you find the perfect piece.

Dining is an event in itself on Main Street and if you want to try them all, you need to start early! After a delicious breakfast at your B&B, we suggest a light mid morning snack of freshly baked croissants and espresso at The Boulangerie Patisserie, Falmouth’s very own Parisian bakery. After you’ve shopped up an appetite, take a trip south of the border (but only across the street) for lunch and a margarita at Anejo’s Mexican Bistro and Tequila Bar  where you’ll experience incredibly authentic fare. If you’re in the mood for fine dining for dinner, we suggest La Osteria La Civetta for amazing hospitality and Italian food made with the freshest local ingredients. If you crave live music and cold beer, Liam Maguire’s Irish Pub has what you need featuring tons of great craft brews on tap and delicious pub style dishes.

As you saunter down Main Street between shopping and snacking, feel free to stop into Belezza, a full service salon and medspa for a soothing massage, luxurious pedicure, or a reinvigorating new hair style. You’ll leave relaxed, reenergized, and ready to continue your day on Main Street. Want to learn a little more about the amazing history of Falmouth? Continue onto Palmer Avenue and visit Falmouth Museums on the Green for a walking tour of the town, or catch a lecture in the beautiful cultural center.

Home to so many businesses unique to Falmouth, ample parking in the lots surrounding, and tons to do. Spend a day discovering all Main Street has to offer!

April and May in Falmouth are the official kick off to our warm weather season. Join us for a long weekend as we celebrate spring with something for everyone.

Arrive in time for Spohr Gardens’ annual Daffodil Days event and you won’t be disappointed. This incredible six-acre garden sits on Oyster Pond and while open year round, the last two Saturdays in April promise thousands upon thousands of daffodils! Daffodil Days has been a tradition at the gardens since 2004, and in the years since, the town has banded together to plant daffodils all over Falmouth. Come for a long weekend and embark on a daffodil tour.

Spohr Gardens is walkable (or kayak/canoe-able) from the B&B’s in Falmouth, and admission is free while donations are appreciated.

From voting on your favorite May basket, to retail sales and dining specials, Falmouth Village Blooming (May 1st – 10th) can’t be missed. The first weekend will include a kids spring hat weekend, and an estate walk on the 3rd at Highfield Hall. There’s a lot going on May 5th; celebrate Cinco De Mayo with Anejo’s (the best Mexican food in town) who will be closing the street next to their restaurant and serving $5 burritos and margaritas with music to match. There’s also a May garden basket design workshop with Anna Holmes on the 5th from 6-8pm. On May 8th, The Locket Project sponsored by View Photography will exhibit “Calling All Heros”, a series of photos depicting special relationships between young boys and the men in their lives. There will be a beautiful story time on May 9th at Eight Cousins Book Store. Come enjoy a reading of Guess How Much I Love You and take photos with Little Nut Brown Hare.

Falmouth Village Blooming will go out with a bang on May 10th with the most incredible garden tour. The Falmouth B&B Association will open their gardens for tours and mini-workshops. Visit Captain’s Manor Inn to learn how cattle troughs are quickly becoming the next big trend in gardening. Saunter over to Palmer House Inn to learn to plant successful container gardens (refreshments provided). Bring the kids to Woods Hole Passage to participate in a child centered garden project and be sure to stop by Woods Hole Inn and Bailey’s by the Sea to enjoy tea and cookies on the porch.

However you like to celebrate spring, Falmouth has you covered!

Woods Hole start lineAugust is all about the Falmouth Road Race here in Falmouth, MA on Cape Cod.  This race started over 40 years ago as a bar bet between a popular bartender and a few pals, and has grown into one of the most important summer races in the US.

This year there were about 11,000 entries including elite runners from all over the world that use the 7 mile course to qualify for the New York Marathon and other races.  With significant prize money on the table and one of the most beautiful courses in America, what’s not to like about the Falmouth Road Race?

Falmouth comes together the day of the race with the course lined with spectators.  The seven mile course starts in Woods Hole at the drawbridge and goes past Nobska Lighthouse, along Surf Drive, past Falmouth Harbor ending in Falmouth Heights near the British Beer Company, a popular local watering hole (and birthplace of the race so many moons ago).

This year was sunny but not too hot and the race went off without a hitch.  Planning to come next year either as a runner or spectator?  Book your B&B now, as the popularity of this weekend is supreme.

 
THE SCARECROWS ARE COMING TO ‘FRIENDLY FALMOUTH’!! As we say farewell to our beautiful summer season and greet the sweet scent of the honeysuckle that is in bloom everywhere, we know that we will be raking leaves, and there are an abundance of them this year, in the very near future!!DSCN1515 The word around Falmouth is that the ‘SCARECROWS’ are returning to be the official greeters to all who visit out wonderful little town in late October! Lots of fun and creative happenings are in store for all of our visitors! September 28-29:   ‘Falmouth Dream Cruise By the Sea’ Car Show Weekend – Classic automobiles from every era show off their charm – a must for car buffs! October 4-6: ‘Jazz Fest Falmouth’ – join our talented musicians during their evening stroll as they entertain you while wandering along Main Street deciding which wonderful restaurant you should enjoy! October 12: ‘Bourne Farm Day’ – Come pick your very own pumpkin, pony rides, hayrides, kayaks and paddle boats in the pond. October 27-28: Cape Cod Marathon – They come from everywhere – sneakers slung over their shoulders, backpacks, water bottles and – most importantly – a lot of wonderful energy!! Falmouth B&B Association eagerly await their fall visitors. You can be assured that there will be lots of apple and cranberry delicacies on their breakfast menu while each individual innkeeper boasts the most delicious pumpkin bread. You will just have to come on down and find out for yourselves!!

Celebrate spring and Mother’s Day in Falmouth! The Falmouth Village Association has a number of activities happening during the first two weeks in May. Specifically for Mother’s Day weekend a few of the events include:

May 9th Vagabond View is previewing a very special photo exhibit called “The Locket Project”. A gallery event and cocktail reception will take place on May 9th from 6-9 pm at Vagabond View located at 95 Palmer Ave Queens Buyway in Falmouth Ma. The Locket Project is an intimate display of the special bond that mothers and daughters share. Special photos will be on display that capture these wonderful relationships. Proceeds from the event will be donated to the Children’s Cove which is a Cape and Islands Advocacy Center. The exhibit will then be on display at Highfield Hall from May 12th until May 31st.

On Mother’s Day May 10th there will be a Bed & Breakfast garden tour that will be free. Exhibits at the participating Bed & Breakfasts will include a fairy cottage garden display, a 2 hour special garden transformation and an herb garden container garden exhibit. There will also be events at the Falmouth Museums on the Green, Flower Power Happy Hours at participating restaurants and other retail store specials on Falmouth Village Main Street.

Read all about Falmouth Village Blooming on the Falmouth Village Association Website.

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Palmer House Inn

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508)-548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

 

 

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments
[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

[/custom_list]

[custom_list type=”check”]

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover

[/custom_list]

Our second big storm of the winter blew through Falmouth today leaving behind a beautiful blanket of snow.  As the wind settled down mid morning, innkeepers served warm breakfasts and then bustled outdoors to clear snow from walkways, stairs and sidewalks.  Visiting Cape Cod in snow is one of the greatest parts of winter, and you will find locals clustered in coffee shops swapping storm tales, sharing a Guiness or two at the pubs on Main Street, and headed out on the bike path in cross country skis.

There are so many great reasons to visit the Cape in winter, especially on the eve of a snowfall, but here are our top five:

1) Beaches are wide open and gorgeous for winter walks

2) No line at Maison Villatte Bakery (real french croissant au chocolat!)

3) Warm welcome from Falmouth innkeepers

4) Snuggling by the fire with a complimentary hot cocoa at your friendly B&B

5) Taking the Martha’s Vineyard ferry in snow offers stunning vistas of the island.

Here are photos of some of the Falmouth B&B’s in this lovely snow fall.  Captain Tom Lawrence House, Palmer House, Woods Hole Passage and Woods Hole Inn are all open at this time of year.  Captains Manor and Inn at Siders Lane are beautiful in snow, but not open for guests until closer to spring time.

Enjoy this photo essay capturing Falmouth B&Bs on this Cape Cod Snow Day, January 22, 2014.

Romantic winter B&B on Cape Cod B&Bs on Cape Cod Romantic winter getaway Cape Cod best Cape Cod B&B great B&Bs on Cape Cod

Candle House in Woods Hole, Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,   Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,  Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 

Candle House in Woods Hole,  Falmouth

The historic Candle House.

The Candle House, built in 1829, is a great historic stop, even if it’s just to admire the stonework from the outside. The Candle House is all that remains of mid-nineteenth-century whaling in Woods Hole. It was part of a series of structures where whale oil was rendered. Today the Candle House is used by the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) for offices and is frequently used to display some of the exhibits for the annual Model Boat Show.

Whaling in Woods Hole

Woods Hole in the 1700 and 1800?s was a quiet and relatively unsettled spot on the South Western corner of Cape Cod.

“These quiet, rural conditions, devoid of adventure, persisted until about 1815, when Woods Hole became an important whaling station from which ships operated on the high seas. The whaling industry in the United States became a very profitable business, and Woods Hole was a part of it. In 1854, the total receipts for the American whaling fleet amounted to $10.8 million, the largest part of this amount resulted from whaling carried out by Massachusetts captains. Woods Hole participated in these activities and prospered. It is known that between 1815 and 1860, not less than nine whaling ships were making port at the Bar Neck wharf, which was located where the U. S. Navy building of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution now stands.” – www.nefsc.noaa.gov/history/stories/whistory.html

The Candle House and Spermaceti Production

Spermaceti is a wax that is found in the head cavities of the sperm whale. After killing the whale, the whalers would sever the head, pull it on deck and cut a hole in order to bail out the matter. The primary source of the oil is from the spermaceti organ. This matter was boiled and strained of impurities to prevent the oil from going rancid. A large whale could yield as much as 500 gallons (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spermaceti). The raw spermaceti would then be stored in casks and brought back to Woods Hole for processed on land in buildings like the Candle House.

At the Candle House the casks were allowed to chill during the winter. The spermaceti would congeal into a spongy and viscous mass. This mass could then be placed into wool sacks and pressed. The resulting liquid was bottled and sold as the mos valuable spermaceti product – “Winter-Strained Sperm Oil,” an oil that remained liquid in freezing temperatures. In the warmer seasons, the left over spermaceti was allowed to partially melt, and the liquid was strained off to leave a fully solid wax. This was bleached and sold as “Spermaceti Wax.”

Other Woods Hole attractions include:

 

 
Candle House detail of the stonework and ship. Located in Woods Hole, Falmouth, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. Photo by P.L.O’Connell.

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 
Wine and seafood by the fire at the Quarterdeck Restaurant in Falmouth, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA.

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

Wine and seafood at the Quarterdeck

The first thing that we noticed as the smiling hostess showed us to our seats – the place was hopping. What is the secret? How do they stay busy year round? The answer is simple: good food, reasonable prices, cheerful employees. It is a hang-out for locals but visitors like it too. The food is traditional New England style cooking. I would say that the specialty is seafood but they have a nice variety of steaks, burgers, chops and chicken, as well as several meatless offerings.

The Quarterdeck is on Main Street in Falmouth Village. We were cozy and comfortable by the wood burning fireplace on this chilly afternoon. We ordered a classic  BLT on toasted Portuguese bread and the Cape Cod Seafood Pot. For a seafood lover, this is the perfect choice. Although it is in the appetizer section of the menu it can be a great meal. It is made by putting a lobster claw, muscles, clams, oysters, lemon wedges, shrimp and Portuguese sausage into a mesh bag. It is boiled in a seafood broth until the shellfish open. Then served in a bowl with the broth, drawn butter and toasted Portuguese bread. It’s like having a mini clam bake.

Some of the other traditional New England offerings  on the menu include: Fish & Chips, Fried Clams, Sweet Atlantic Sea Scallops, Day Boat Schrod and Lobster, boiled or baked stuffed.

The Quarterdeck was opened in 1967. Much of the interior had been salvaged from MacDougall’s Boatyard in Falmouth Harbor. Some of the wood dates back to the 1600?s. Joe Downs, a local artist, built the interior to look like the below the deck of an old sailing ship. He also created the stain glass in the dining room. The stain glass windows that are located over the bar were once the front windows from a church in Maine. There are conflicting stories about whether the church was destroyed by fire or a hurricane but there they stand now being enjoyed by many a diner.

Quarterdeck Restaurant
164 Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
(508) 548-9900
www.qdfalmouth.com

Other Restaurants in Falmouth Village include:

 

20140206_112342“Top O’ The Mornin’ To Ye” from  O’Falmouth

 

“Wishing you rainbows after the rain,

Miles and miles of Irish smiles,

Shamrocks at your doorway,

And a host of friends that never ends

Each day your whole life through”!

 

The quintessential Village of Falmouth here on Cape Cod is opening its heart and offering a warm welcome to have you join us for a wonderful celebration of St. Patrick’s Day.  Shamrocks will pave the way for a fun filled weekend and, on occasion, there will be a leprechaun or two waving from a very quiet corner!  Don’t try to find them!! 

The lamp poles will be wrapped in green, the Irish flag will be furling from our very own Liam’s Irish Pub – always a fun place to enjoy the music and a little Bailey’s!  And to ‘top off the weekend’ – an Irish Hat Parade down Main St. on Monday!!  So don’t forget your ‘tam’!!  And, if we really have the ‘luck of the Irish’ going our way – you can take a lovely stroll on the ‘strand’ just down the way a bit.

The Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association is offering some very festive packages to go along with the weekend (3/14-17) festivities.  Some will be doing a traditional Irish breakfast, or you can indulge in a cozy afternoon Irish Teatime, along with gift certificates to some of our wonderful restaurants here in town.  We are very excited and look forward to having some wonderful folks enjoy our Irish hospitality and warm Irish smile.

Falmouth Christmas Parade

Falmouth Cape Cod’s iconic Christmas Parade

The Falmouth Holiday Season is particularly special this year with so many activities to enjoy.

A part of the season kickoff is the Falmouth Holiday Parade which celebrated 50 years in 2013.  This is the largest Holiday Parade in Southeastern Massachusetts.

Celebrate the season with residents and visitors alike and then stroll Main Street and enjoy the window treatments while shopping for holiday gifts.

There is the singing of Holiday carols at Nobska Lighthouse, the annual lighting of the Falmouth Village Green displays, 2nd annual Jingle Jog and Elf Run, Seafaring Santa Sailing into Falmouth and much more.
 
 

Highfield Hall entrance decorated for the holidays.

Highfield Hall’s entrance decorated for the Holidays.

An annual tradition has been Holidays at  Highfield Hall.  Every year it just gets better!  This year the interior decorations were magnificent and then there was the terrific electric train display, the pocket full of poseys display, the international creche displays and the new holiday store in just off the grand hallway.

Call any of our Inns to inquire about availability for this special promotion where you book a two night stay for either April or May  and receive your choice of either 2 ferry tickets to Martha’s Vineyard OR a 50% credit for 2 roundtrip Peter Pan bus tickets from Boston.

[SlideDeck id=’87’ width=’100%’ height=’370px’]

 

 

Japanese red maple soaks in the sun

Japanese red maple soaks in the sun

 

Fall is an amazing time here in Falmouth. What we love about Cape Cod in the summer becomes somehow more magical in the fall.

 

 

 

The weather can be warm one day and then nipping at our noses the next.

Sudden snow makes a single November day of beauty

Sudden snow makes a single November day one of beauty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The trees are bright with color and the skies are beyond blue.

There is so much beauty in nature it’s time to stop and take a look at the changing lands around us.

Bright yellow on the village green

Bright yellow on the village green

 

 

 

 

 

As we are watching the last of the local color make its way to the ground, the town of Falmouth is busying itself with all the preparations for Holidays by the Sea, our annual town celebration.The streets are getting decked out.

 

 

Choo Choo!

Choo Choo!

The train set in Eastman’s Ace Hardware window on Main Street is new this year. Soon the square will have its displays, tree and choirs. The lights will twinkle all up and down the avenue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And all our Innkeepers are readying for our Bed and Breakfast Open House.  There will be sweets and treats and a raffle.  It is $10 per person.  The proceeds from the event will benefit the Falmouth Military Support Group.  It will be held Sunday, December 8  from 1:30 to 4:30 right after the best parade on the Cape!

A perfect apple pie to share makes everyone smile

A perfect apple pie to share makes everyone smile

So come experience Falmouth during the Holidays and get a chance to feel the warmth of a community.

Gracious accommodation and warm hospitality in Falmouth Village

75 Locust Street
Falmouth Village
800-266-8139
Captaintomlawrence.com
Capttomhouse@aol.com
ExteriorforFBBslideshowGraceful lodging in Falmouth Village  set on 1.2 acres of lovely manicured grounds. A short stroll from restaurants, boutique shops, shining sea bikeway, etc.

(508)- 388 -7336

27 W Main Street
Falmouth, MA 02540
captainsmanorinn.com
innkeepers@captainsmanorinn.com

Rooms and Rates

This property has 8 guest rooms with private bathrooms. The types of beds available are Queen and King. Payment types accepted include Cash, Visa, Master Card, Discover, and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $125 to $325 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments.

Available Food Service

  • Coffee and Tea 24/7
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments
  • Picnic Lunches

Inn Amenities

  • Air Conditioning
  • Beach Chairs
  • Beach Towels
  • Bicycles (rentals across street)
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Ceiling Fans
  • Clock/Ipod Radios
  • Fax
  • Fireplace
  • Gardens and Outdoor Guest areas
  • Hairdryers
  • Iron/Ironing Boards
  • Library
  • Porch
  • Public Computer
  • Refrigerator
  • Spa Robes
  • Queen or King Beds
  • Free WiFi
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)

Inn Policies

  • Cash Accepted • Travelers Checks Accepted • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • Discover

Settle In, Relax,  Explore Cape Cod

Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association: a close knit group working together to help you find the high quality accommodation you are looking for. Call a Falmouth innkeeper today for the better way to stay in Falmouth.

Settle In,  Relax,  Explore Cape Cod

Falmouth Bed and Breakfast Association: a close knit group working together to help you find the high quality accommodation you are looking for. Call a Falmouth innkeeper today for the better way to stay in Falmouth.


View Falmouth Bed & Breakfast Association in a larger map

Romantic Queen Anne style Cape Cod B&B with beautiful woodwork, warm fireplaces and elegant antique furnishings, located in Falmouth’s historic district.

(508) 548-1230

81 Palmer Avenue
Falmouth, MA 02540
www.palmerhouseinn.com
innkeepers@palmerhouseinn.com

 

Rooms & Rates

This property has 16 guest rooms with Queen Beds or King beds and private bathrooms. One three room suite/cottage. Payment types accepted include Visa, Master Card, Discover, Travelers Checks and Personal Checks. Card, American Express and Travelers Checks. Rates range from $169 to $299 depending on time of year. Rates Include Full Breakfast and Afternoon Refreshments.

Available Room Service

  • Early Morning Tea/Coffee upon request
  • Full Breakfast
  • Afternoon Refreshments

Inn Amenities

  • Air Conditioning (window)
  • Beach Chairs | Beach Towels
  • Bicycles available
  • Board Games
  • Cable TV
  • Hairdryers
  • Alarm Clock
  • Refrigerator
  • Queen Beds, King beds
  • Iron, Ironing Boards
  • Gardens or Outdoor Guest areas
  • Free Parking (limited to 1 car per guest room)
  • Free WiFi
  • Easy Walk to Village
  • Fireplaces
  • Whirlpool Tubs

Inn Policies

  • Cash Accepted
  • Travelers Checks Accepted
  • Visa
  • Non-smoking Property
  • Childrens 12+ welcome
  • Master Card
  • American Express
  • Discover
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